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ARTHRITIS

BACK CONDITIONS

CANCER

CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME

CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS

DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

HEART CONDITIONS

LEARNING DISABILITIES

LUPUS

INTELLECTUAL OR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

MENTAL HEALTH IMPAIRMENTS

MULTIPLE CHEMICAL SENSITIVITY

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

VISION IMPARMENTS

WHEELCHAIR USE


ARTHRITIS

There are an estimated 40 million Americans with arthritis, affecting 1 out of every 7 individuals. Prevalence varies significantly depending upon the type of arthritis. For example, rheumatoid arthritis affects 2.1 million individuals while psoriatic arthritis affects 160,000. Women are affected by arthritis more than men; nearly 23 million women of all ages have arthritis. Arthritis is the number one cause of disability in America. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page at .

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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BACK CONDITIONS

According to the National Institute of Health, eight out of ten adults will have a low back problem at some time in their lives. The human spine consists of several vertebra, small bones that are stacked on top of each other to form the spinal column. Between each vertebra is a cushion known as a disc. The vertebrae are joined by ligaments, and muscles are attached to the vertebrae by bands of tissue called tendons. Openings in each vertebra line up to form a long hollow canal. The spinal cord runs through this canal from the base of the brain. Nerves from the spinal cord branch outward and leave the spine through the spaces between the vertebrae. Any problem with the bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons, nerves, or bones in the back causes pain that is easily aggravated. Moving may cause just as much pain as remaining in a static position. A low back problem may come on suddenly or gradually. It is acute if it lasts a short time, usually a few days to several weeks. An episode that lasts longer than three months is often considered chronic. Many symptoms are from muscle tension or spasm, back sprains, ligament or muscle tears, and joint problems. Other impairments, such as arthritis and obesity, may also lead to back impairments or limitations typically associated with back impairments, e.g., lifting. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

Individual has gross motor limitations that cause difficulty lifting, carrying, moving, transferring, sitting, standing, walking, and climbing and accessing workstations and work-sites.
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CANCER

Cancer is a group of many related diseases. All forms of cancer involve out-of-control growth of abnormal cells. Normal body cells grow, divide, and die in an orderly fashion. Cancer cells, however, continue to grow and divide, spreading to other parts of the body and accumulating to form tumors that destroy normal tissue. If cells break away, they can travel through the bloodstream or the lymph system to other areas of the body where they may settle and form "colony" tumors. In their new location, the cancer cells continue growing and spread to a new site, metastasis. When cancer spreads it is still named after the part of the body where it started. Different types of cancer vary in their rates of growth, patterns of spread, and responses to different types of treatment.

Treatment options may include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and immunotherapy. Surgery is the oldest form of cancer treatment; sixty percent of people with cancer will have surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy waves, such as x-rays or gamma rays, to destroy cancer cells. Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to treat cancer. Systemic chemotherapy uses anticancer drugs that are usually given into a vein or by mouth to enter the bloodstream and reach all areas of the body. Hormone therapy is treatment with hormones, drugs that interfere with hormone production. Immunotherapy is the use of treatments that promote or support the body's immune system response to a disease such as cancer.

Because of the variation in types of cancers, treatments for cancers, and the responses of individuals to cancer, limitations of individuals with cancer vary. Some individuals may not need an accommodation, while other may need only one or two.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME

CFS, also known as chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS), is a disorder characterized by profound fatigue that is not improved by bed rest and that may be worsened by physical or mental activity. Persons with CFS must often function at a substantially lower level of activity than they were capable of before the onset of illness. In addition to these key defining characteristics, patients report various nonspecific symptoms, including weakness, muscle pain, impaired memory and/or mental concentration, insomnia, and post-exertional fatigue lasting more than 24 hours. In some cases, CFS can persist for years.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS

CTDs are disorders that are caused, precipitated, or aggravated by repeated exertions or movements of the body. Continuous use or pressure over an extended period of time results in wear and tear on tendons, muscles, and sensitive nerve tissue. Most common parts of the body affected are the wrists, hands, shoulders, back, neck, and eyes. CTDs are groups of disorders with similar characteristics and may be referred to as: repetitive trauma disorders, repetitive strain injuries, overuse syndromes, regional musculoskeletal disorders, and work-related disorders.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

It is estimated that there are more than 28 million Americans who are deaf or hard of hearing. Hearing loss is the reduced ability to hear sound and may develop for various reasons. An individual may have a congenital loss from childhood or an adult illness that can result in total loss or a degree of hearing loss. The effects of aging, acute injury, or progressive loss over time due to excessive or prolonged exposure to noise may also result in hearing loss for some people. Individuals who may be deaf, hard of hearing or experiencing hyperacusis or tinnitus may require work-site accommodations to enable successful performance of essential job functions. Accommodations will not always be necessary, nor will they always be effective.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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HEART CONDITIONS

There are several types of heart conditions. Heart valve abnormalities, congenital heart disease, congestive heart failure, enlarged heart, murmurs, hypertension, marfan syndrome, and rheumatic fever may also contribute to a heart condition. Congenital cardiovascular defects, present in about one percent of live births, may be other causes. Each type of heart condition has its own set of indicators and most symptoms could be caused by other conditions. Also, some heart conditions may have no noticeable effects and may develop differently in women than in men. Women's symptoms may progress over a much longer period of time and also be subtler than men's symptoms. Men over 45 years old and woman over 55 years old, or women who have passed menopause or had their ovaries removed have a greater chance of being diagnosed with heart conditions. Looking at specific age groups, cardiovascular disease from a heart condition is the number one disease affecting individuals age 65 and older, second for ages 25 through 64, third for ages zero through 14, and fifth for ages 15 through 24. One in five males and females are affected: one in three men and one in 10 women. Depending upon what type of heart condition an individual has, surgery, drugs, exercise, diet modification, or a transplant may be options.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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LEARNING DISABILITIES

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (2006), learning disabilities are disorders that affect the ability to understand or use spoken or written language, do mathematical calculations, coordinate movements, or direct attention. Although learning disabilities occur in very young children, the disorders are usually not recognized until the child reaches school age. Learning disabilities are a lifelong condition; they are not outgrown or cured, though many people develop coping techniques through special education, tutoring, medication, therapy, personal development, or adaptation of learning skills. Approximately 15 million children, adolescents, and adults have learning disabilities in the United States (National Center for Learning, 2006).

What types of learning disabilities are there?

Learning disabilities can be divided into three broad categories: developmental speech and language disorders, academic skills disorders, and other (such as coordination disorders). Each category includes more specific disorders, which are described below.

Specific Learning Disability:
A disorder in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, which may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, write, spell or to do mathematical calculations. Included in this category are expressive writing disorders and other expressive language disorders.
Dyslexia:
A person with dyslexia has average to above average intelligence, but has deficits in visual, auditory, or motor process, which interfere with reading and reading comprehension. The individual may also have difficulties with learning to translate printed words into spoken words with ease.
Dyscalculia:
A person with dyscalculia has average to above average intelligence, but has difficulty with numbers or remembering facts over a long period of time. Some persons have spatial problems and difficulty aligning numbers into proper columns. Some persons may reverse numbers, and have difficulty in mathematical operations.
Dyspraxia:
A person with dyspraxia has problems with messages from the brain being properly transmitted to the body. Though the muscles are not paralyzed or weak, they have problems working well together. Dyspraxia might also cause speech problems, poor posture, poor sense of directions, and/or difficulty with actions such as throwing and catching.
Auditory Perceptual Deficit:
A person with auditory perceptual deficit has difficulty receiving accurate information from the sense of hearing (there is no problem with the individual's hearing, just in how the brain interprets what is heard) and might have problems understanding and remembering oral instructions, differentiating between similar sounds, or hearing one sound over a background noise.
Visual Perceptual Deficit:
The individual has difficulties receiving and/or processing accurate information from their sense of sight; might have a problem picking out an object from a background of other objects or seeing things in correct order.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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LUPUS

Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that causes inflammation of various parts of the body. The body's immune system normally makes proteins called antibodies to protect the body against viruses, bacteria, and other foreign materials called antigens. In an autoimmune disorder such as lupus, the immune system loses its ability to tell the difference between antigens and its own cells and tissues. The immune system then makes antibodies directed against "self." These antibodies, called "auto-antibodies," react with the "self" antigens to form immune complexes; individuals with lupus produce too many antibodies. The immune complexes build up in the tissues and cause inflammation, injury to tissues, and pain by attacking functioning organs, especially the skin, joints, blood, and kidneys. Lupus is a condition where the body's defense mechanism goes into overdrive and starts to attack itself. There are an estimated 1,400,000 to 2,000,000 people with lupus, affecting 1 out of every 185 Americans. Most individuals are diagnosed with lupus between the ages of 20 and 40.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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INTELLECTUAL OR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

On October 6, 2010, President Barrack Obama signed into law Rosa's Law. Rosa's Law changes references in federal law from mental retardation to intellectual disability and references to a mentally retarded individual to an individual with an intellectual disability. For more information, read Rosa's Law. Rosa's Law specifically pertains to federal employers. Most public and private organizations will be expected to replace the term "mental retardation" with "intellectual disability."

According to the President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities, an estimated seven to eight million Americans of all ages experience intellectual disability. Intellectual disabilities affect about one in ten families in the United States. Administration for Children & Families

An intellectual disability is a disability that involves significant limitations both in intellectual functioning and in adaptive behavior. Adaptive behaviors include many everyday social and practical skills such as interpersonal and communication skills, social problem solving and responsibility, the use of time and money, as well as daily personal care and safety. Limitations in individuals often coexist with strengths and will vary from individual to individual. This disability originates before the age of 18 and encompasses a wide range of conditions, types, and levels. Intellectual disability is caused by factors that can be physical, genetic, and/or social. American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Additional Helpful Terminology

Developmental disabilities that may also include an intellectual disability are briefly described below. Intellectual disabilities can also be caused by a head injury, stroke or illness. For some no cause is found. Intellectual disabilities will vary in degree and effect from person to person, just as individual capabilities vary considerably among people who do not have an intellectual disability. People should not make generalizations about the needs of persons with intellectual disabilities. In some instances an intellectual disability will not be obvious from a person's appearance, nor will it be accompanied by a physical disability. Persons with intellectual disabilities successfully perform a wide range of jobs, and can be dependable workers. (EEOC, 2011)

Autism: Individuals with disabilities on the autism spectrum may have complex developmental disabilities that typically appear during the first three years of life. These disabilities are the result of a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain, impacting development in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Both children and adults with disabilities on the autism spectrum typically show difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions, and play or leisure activities. Learn more

Cerebral Palsy is a condition, sometimes thought of as a group of disorders, that can involve brain and nervous system functions such as movement, learning, hearing, seeing, and thinking. Cerebral palsy is caused by injuries or abnormalities of the brain. Most of these problems occur as the baby grows in the womb, but they can happen at any time during the first two years of life, while the baby's brain is still developing. Learn more

Down Syndrome is a genetic disorder that causes lifelong intellectual disabilities, developmental delays and other complications. Down syndrome varies in severity, so developmental problems range from moderate to serious. Down syndrome is the most common genetic cause of severe intellectual disabilities in children. Individuals with Down syndrome have a higher incidence of heart defects, leukemia, sleep apnea, and dementia later in life. Learn more

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a condition that results from prenatal alcohol exposure. It is a cluster of mental and physical birth defects that include intellectual disabilities, growth deficits, central nervous system dysfunction, craniofacial abnormalities and behavioral instabilities. Fetal Alcohol Effect is a less severe set of the same symptoms. It is the only form of intellectual disability that can be totally prevented and eradicated. Learn more

Fragile X Syndrome is a hereditary condition that can cause learning problems ranging from subtle learning disabilities and a normal IQ, to severe intellectual disabilities and autism. Individuals with Fragile X Syndrome may also have physical and behavioral disorders, and speech and language delays. Learn more

Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is the most common known genetic cause of life-threatening obesity in children. PWS typically causes low muscle tone, short stature if not treated with growth hormone, and a chronic feeling of hunger that, coupled with a metabolism that utilizes drastically fewer calories than normal, can lead to excessive eating and life-threatening obesity. PWS is also characterized by motor development delays along with some behavior problems and unique medical issues. Intellectual deficits can be present to varying degrees, but even higher functioning individuals will have learning difficulties. Learn more

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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MENTAL HEALTH IMPAIRMENTS

The following information regarding mental health impairments has been edited from several sources, including many of the resources listed in the organization section of this website The information is not intended to be medical advice. If medical advice is needed, appropriate medical professionals should be consulted.

What are mental health impairments?

According to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General, mental disorders are defined as "diagnosable conditions that impair thinking, feeling and behavior, and interfere with a person's capacity to be productive and enjoy fulfilling relationships." The report uses the term mental illness to refer collectively to all diagnosable mental disorders. According to the landmark "Global Burden of Disease" study, commissioned by the World Health Organization and the World Bank, 4 of the 10 leading causes of disability for persons age 5 and older are mental disorders. Among developed nations, including the United States, major depression is the leading cause of disability. Also near the top of these rankings are manic-depressive illness, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. About 15 percent of the U.S. adult population use some form of mental health service in any year.

What are common mental health impairments?

Depression:
Depressive disorders are serious illnesses that affect a person's mood, concentration, sleep, activity, appetite, social behavior, and feelings. Depressive disorders come in different forms, the most common being major depression (unipolar depression). Major depression, the leading cause of disability in the United States, affects over nine million adults in a given year. Despite the disabling effects, depression may be treatable.
Bipolar disorder:
Bipolar disorder (manic depression) is a brain disorder involving episodes of mania and depression. It affects more than two million American adults. Effective treatments are available that greatly reduce the symptoms of bipolar disorder and allow people to lead normal and productive lives.
Schizophrenia:
Schizophrenia is a severe and chronic brain disorder that affects approximately two million Americans today. Schizophrenia impairs a person's ability to think clearly, manage his or her emotions, make decisions, and relate to others. People with schizophrenia suffer terrifying symptoms that often leave them fearful and withdrawn. However, this illness is highly treatable, and new discoveries and treatments are continually improving the outlook for people with this disorder.
Anxiety disorders:
Anxiety disorders include panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), generalized anxiety disorder, and phobias (social phobia, agoraphobia, and specific phobias). More than 19 million American adults suffer from an anxiety disorder in a given year, and many people have more than one anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorders frequently co-occur with depressive disorders, eating disorders, or substance abuse. Depending on the type of anxiety disorder(s) someone has, effective treatments can include medication(s), psychosocial therapies, or a combination of the two.

Source: National Alliance on Mental Illness

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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MULTIPLE CHEMICAL SENSITIVITY

MCS Research and Definition

The medical community has long questioned the etiology of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) or Environmental Illness (EI). According to Cynthia Wilson of the Chemical Injury Information Network, as long ago as the 1950's physician's recognized that people were becoming sick due to their environment (Learn more). There have been many theories regarding the cause of MCS but due to the lack of reliable scientific research, the medical community and the general public have failed to recognize the physiological effects of chemicals on the body.

In an article providing an overview of MCS, Cynthia Wilson states, "The latest research strongly suggests that chemical sensitivity is most probably some combination of central nervous system damage and enzyme deficiencies that can also cause problems with the endocrine and immune systems. Chemical sensitivity is more often than not characterized by real, verifiable damage to the body, though the implications of these anomalies are poorly understood and need additional research." (Learn more). A researcher by the name of Dr. M.B. Lax of the Central New York Occupational Health Clinic offered his assessment of the current struggle in understanding MCS. In an article entitled, Multiple chemical sensitivities: The social construction of an illness, he wrote, "Multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) has emerged as an important and highly controversial issue in occupational health. Debate centers on whether the illness is "physical" or "psychological." A strong corporate-backed campaign has framed the debate and has pushed MCS advocates into a strategy of "proving the physical" nature of MCS." (Learn more).

An article published in the Archives of Environmental Health (Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: A 1999 Concensus. 1999. Vol. 54, 147-149) provides information regarding a consensus reached by medical professionals who have agreed upon specific criteria to be used in determining a diagnosis of MCS based upon a study by Nethercott et al. published in the Archives of Environmental Health (Multiple Chemical Sensitivities Syndrome: Toward a working case definition. 1993. Vol. 48, 19-26). The criteria, in brief, require that symptoms are reproducible with repeated chemical exposure, the condition is chronic, symptoms result from low level exposure, symptoms improve or resolve when the irritant is removed, response occurs to multiple chemically unrelated substances and symptoms involve multiple organ systems.

Symptoms and Limitations

MCS or EI may develop from exposure to substances in the environment and may result in intolerance to even very low level exposure to chemicals. Symptoms can occur in more than one organ system in the body, such as the nervous system, the lungs and the vascular system. An individual may be exposed through contact with, ingestion of or inhalation of a specific or multiple irritants.

Limitations experienced due to MCS or EI are experienced by each person individually so it is important to evaluate each situation independently. Some of the more common symptoms that develop from exposure to problematic environmental substances may include one or many of the following: headache, nausea, respiratory difficulties, fatigue, dizziness, tightening of the throat, chronic laryngitis, difficulty concentrating, memory loss, rash or hives, arthritis-like sensations or muscle pain. Problematic environmental substances may include: fragrance chemicals used in perfumes, colognes, cleaning products and deodorizers; pesticides; fumes from building products, new furniture and carpet; and tobacco smoke among other irritants.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

MS is a chronic disease of the central nervous system. It causes destruction of myelin (a protein that forms a protective coating around nerve cells) in the central nervous system. When myelin is destroyed signals traveling through the nerve cells are interrupted or delayed, resulting in various neurologic symptoms occurring at different locations throughout the body. The progress, severity, and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are giving hope to those affected by the disease.

MS is often characterized by a pattern of exacerbation and remission. Symptoms may be mild, such as numbness in the limbs, or severe, such as paralysis or loss of vision. Possible symptoms include fatigue, loss of coordination, muscle weakness, spasticity, numbness, slurred speech, visual difficulties, paralysis, muscle cramps, bladder or bowel problems, and sexual dysfunction. The initial symptoms of MS are most often difficulty walking; abnormal sensations such as numbness or "pins and needles"; and pain and loss of vision due to optic neuritis, an inflammation of the optic nerve. Less common initial symptoms may include tremor; lack of coordination; slurred speech; sudden onset of paralysis, similar to a stroke; and decline in cognitive function.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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VISION IMPAIRMENTS

There are an estimated 10 million blind and visually impaired people in the United States, 1.3 million of which are considered legally blind (American Foundation for the Blind, 2006a). Of this number, approximately 109,000 people use long canes for assistance, while about 7,000 individuals use service dogs (American Foundation for the Blind, 2006a).

Vision impairments result from conditions that range from the presence of some usable vision, low vision, to the absence of any vision, total blindness. Low vision is a term that describes a person with a vision impairment that cannot be improved by correction but has some usable vision remaining. Legal blindness is defined as 20/200 or less in the better eye with the best possible correction. Errors of refraction, diseases of the eye, and other vision-related conditions are usually the cause of vision loss. Each of these categories includes more specific disorders, which are described below (American Foundation for the Blind, 2006b).

Common Errors of Refraction

Myopia (Nearsightedness):
Close objects look clear while distant objects appear blurred.
Hyperopia (Farsightedness):
The ability to see objects clearly at a distance while close objects appear blurry.
Astigmatism:
Due to the irregular curvature of the cornea, vision is blurry for both near and far objects.
Presbyopia:
The eye lens becomes less elastic (associated with aging) and produces blurred vision when focusing on near objects.
Common
Diseases of the Eye
Cataracts:
Clouding of the eye's lens that causes loss of vision.
Glaucoma:
Pressure inside the eye is elevated and can cause damage to the optic nerve, which results in damage to peripheral vision.
Macular Degeneration:
There is a disturbance of blood vessels in the eye resulting in progressive loss of central vision.
Retinitis Pigmentosa:
There is a degeneration of pigment in the eye that is needed to absorb light and create visual images, leading to "tunnel vision" and night blindness.
Retinopathy (due to Diabetes):
Retinopathy typically affects the blood circulation of the retina, which causes blotchy vision.

Other Vision Related Conditions

Night Blindness:
Night blindness results from pigmentary degeneration of the retina, which leads to difficulty seeing in low light.
Color Vision Deficiency:
A color vision deficiency occurs when cone cells of the retina, which provide daylight and color vision, are affected and there is difficulty distinguishing among colors. Typically this only involves certain hues, for example a red-green deficiency; total color blindness (achromatic vision) is rare.
Lack of Depth Perception:
A lack of depth perception is often caused by the loss of sight in one eye, resulting in difficulty with foreground/background discrimination.
Floaters:
Floaters are small specks or clouds moving in the field of vision.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Depending on the individual's limitations and job functions, additional questions may need to be asked to determine what accommodations can be effective. For example:

No vision considerations:

Low vision considerations:

Color vision deficiency considerations:

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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WHEELCHAIR USE

People use wheelchairs for a variety of reasons, the most common reason being paralysis from spinal cord injuries. Current estimates indicate there are 250,000 to 400,000 individuals living with a spinal cord injury or spinal dysfunction; eighty-two percent of these are male. Also, individuals with arthritis, multiple sclerosis, back conditions, cancer, and other impairments may use wheelchairs to assist with mobility.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

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