Spotlight on Accommodating Individuals with Depression in the Workplace

Posted by Kim Cordingly on August 26, 2014 under Accommodations, Employers, General Information, Organizations | Comments are off for this article

By: Daniel Tucker, Consultant

With the recent tragic loss of legendary actor and comedian Robin Williams, there has been much discussion surrounding mental health issues and depression in particular. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), in 2012 approximately 16 million adults had suffered at least one major depressive episode in the past year, representing just under 7 percent of all adults in the United States. JAN frequently receives calls from various individuals concerning employees with depression in the workplace, so we wanted to touch on some basic information and resources people may find helpful.

There are a variety of depressive disorders according to the DSM-5 (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Generally, symptoms of depressive disorders include prolonged feelings of sadness, loss of interest in most or all activities, and difficulty concentrating, and can also include loss of appetite, insomnia, and feelings of worthlessness, among other symptoms. An individual diagnosed with a depressive disorder will meet the definition of disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in most cases.

Due to the symptoms mentioned above, employees with depression may have difficulty performing job tasks and meeting performance and conduct standards. However, with the proper accommodations and support, employees can continue to work successfully. Typical accommodations include allowing leave for treatment, including doctor appointments; taking steps to reduce distractions and stress; providing praise and positive reinforcement; and permitting the employee to take breaks as needed. In many cases, providing a schedule modification in the form of a flexible schedule or later start time, providing additional unpaid breaks, and removing or modifying marginal job functions can be helpful as well. As always, effective accommodations must be determined on a case by case basis as every situation is unique.

For more accommodation ideas and information, you can visit JAN’s resources for individuals with depression. You can also visit our other mental health publications. If you have any questions regarding depression and workplace accommodations, please feel free to contact JAN for individualized assistance.

References:

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) (2014, August 20). Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/statistics/1mdd_adult.shtml.

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.

Resources:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
1-800-273-TALK (8255)

National Alliance on Mental Illness

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