Hobby Groups, Workplace Wellness, and Stress Reduction

Posted by Kim Cordingly on June 29, 2016 under Accommodations, Employers, General Information | Comments are off for this article

By: Kelsey Lewis, Consultant – Cognitive/Neurological Team

Every Thursday afternoon, I grab my yarn and knitting needles and join some of my colleagues at JAN for our “Yarn Club.” A mix of knitters and crocheters gather together during our lunch hour and get to work. While working on our own individual projects, we chat about our work or home lives, and sometimes even delve into deeper topics like religion or politics. Most times though, we spend the hour laughing — a lot. Regardless of the topic, this hour has become something I look forward to every week. Not only has it provided the chance to get to know the group members on a more personal level, but it is truly a therapeutic activity.

There is something about working with my hands and focusing my attention more on this art, and less on my daily stressors, that reenergizes me for the rest of the workday. Other group members have expressed the positive benefits they also feel from working on their individual projects in a shared group setting. This made me think — if more workplaces formed hobby groups, the work environment may be filled with many more relaxed employees.

JAN’s cognitive/neurological team frequently fields situations in which stress plays a significant role in the productivity of an employee with a disability. For instance, many employers share experiences of employees requesting an accommodation of a “less stressful environment.” Other times, we hear of employees having poor attendance or needing to take leave as an accommodation because workplace stress has exacerbated their pre-existing conditions. Although there are accommodations that can help relieve stress to a degree, such as allowing additional breaks to practice stress reduction activities, providing a quiet work area, or using environmental sound machines, additional solutions may be necessary to continue the feeling of relaxation throughout the work day. While forming hobby groups is not a formal accommodation, creating a workplace environment that fosters these type of activities can contribute overall to employee productivity and job satisfaction.

Knitting is certainly not the only hobby that can help relieve stress throughout the work day. Depending on the space and time available, all sorts of interest groups could be formed, including those that involve movement like walking, yoga, or martial arts. Other groups might focus more on hobbies like reading, scrapbooking, model building, or a new personal favorite — adult coloring books! There are many research studies linking physical activity to increased mental health, lower levels of tension, elevated and stabilized mood, better sleep, and improved self-esteem. But how about hobbies as a way to relieve stress?

According to one study that examined the bodily reactions of 115 men and women while performing leisure activities/hobbies, virtually all participants reported lower stress levels and had a lower heart rate during these activities compared to rest of their day. The participants reported that they were 34% less stressed, 18% less sad, and their heart rate dropped approximately 3%. Maybe the most important aspect of the study was that it showed that the positive effects carried over after the participant stopped the activity. This important piece may link hobbies to improved health over the span of a lifetime (Zawadzki, Smyth, & Costigan, 2015).

In conclusion, if you’re looking for a way to reduce stress throughout your work day, or even improve your overall health, why not consider creating a hobby group? Whether this means revisiting those old passions you forgot you enjoy or trying something you’ve never done before, hobby groups are a great way of getting to know your colleagues and tackle the rest of your day with a smile on your face!

References:

Fitzpatrick, K. (2016). Why adult coloring books are good for you. Retrieved from
http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/06/health/adult-coloring-books-popularity-mental-health/

Zawadzki, M. J., Smyth, J. M., & Costigan, H. J. (2015). Real-Time associations between engaging in leisure and daily health and well-being. Retrieved from http://www.ucmerced.edu/sites/ucmerced.edu/files/documents/zawadzki-paper-2015.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources for Those Affected by Trauma Related Disability and LGBTQ Workplace Supports

Posted by Kim Cordingly on June 17, 2016 under Accommodations, ADAAA, Employers | Comments are off for this article

By: Matthew McCord, Consultant – Mobility Team

Support from JAN

In light of the tragedy that occurred at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando this week, I’d like to discuss how experiencing a traumatic event can lead to someone developing a disability or having one exacerbated. It is true that traumatic events happen every day and come in many forms. They can happen in a multitude of ways, and certainly do not need to be on the scale of the horrific events at Pulse for them to be considered traumatic. The possible disabilities an individual could experience as a result of trauma or violence is a long list, and the resulting impairments that one may experience because of this is equally large. These can include mobility impairments as a result of acute injuries that affect walking, standing, grasping, bending and reaching; cognitive/mental health impairments that may lead to difficulty tolerating stress, sleep disruptions, depression, anxiety; or multiple internal injuries that cause chronic pain or headaches.

If you have experienced a traumatic event, be it an event like the tragedy at Pulse or otherwise, we here at JAN can help you explore possible workplace accommodations and understand your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). To give you a starting point of what may be helpful for you to request as an accommodation, please explore the A to Z of Disabilities and Accommodations section of our Website. As always, if you have specific questions do not hesitate to contact us via our toll-free phone, E-mail, or chat. Our services are free and all information is confidential.

LGBTQ Issues, Workplace Discrimination, and the EEOC

As a consultant at JAN, the traumatic shooting at Pulse highlights an important topic in terms of workplace discrimination and employment issues — the fact that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), in addition to enforcing the employment provisions of the ADA and Rehabilitation Act, can also help members of the LGBTQ community when they are subject to discrimination in the workplace. I have read multiple posts on social media during the course of this tragedy stating this trauma is heightened for them by the fact that LGBTQ people still do not have employment protections under federal law. These posts refer to things like at-will employment laws (when an employer can terminate an employee at any time for any reason) and the fact that no federal law specifically mentions providing protections to the LGBTQ community. They state that they can be fired for any reason. But, this is in fact not the case.

The EEOC, which is the federal agency that enforces laws relating to employment discrimination, does in fact accept cases when the discrimination is based on sexual orientation or gender identity. They do this, despite the fact that no federal law specifically mentions that they protect these individuals, because the Civil Rights Act of 1964 provides protection against employment discrimination when it is due to reasons relating to sex.

In the publication below, EEOC writes:

“Although Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not explicitly include sexual orientation or gender identity, the EEOC and courts have said that sex discrimination includes discrimination based on an applicant or employee’s gender identity or sexual orientation.”

Preventing Employment Discrimination against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual or Transgender Workers

We all need to do what we can in light of this tragedy. I hope this assists some of you and also helps to honor those who were lost on that night in Orlando.

Resource:

What You Should Know about EEOC and the Enforcement Protections for LGBT Workers