Recognizing Learning Disabilities (LD) Awareness Month

Posted by Kim Cordingly on October 29, 2015 under Accommodations, Employers, Organizations | Comments are off for this article

By: Melanie Whetzel, Lead Consultant – Cognitive/Neurological Team

Not only is October National Disability Employment Awareness Month, but it is also Learning Disabilities Awareness Month. JAN is joining with others such as LD OnLine and the Learning Disabilities Association of America (LDA) to bring more awareness of learning disabilities and to share information about our resources.

What does the term learning disabilities really mean? Learning Disabilities refer to a number of disorders that may affect the acquisition, organization, retention, understanding or use of verbal or nonverbal information. These disorders affect learning in individuals who otherwise demonstrate at least average abilities essential for thinking and/or reasoning.

Learning disabilities result from impairments in one or more processes related to perceiving, thinking, remembering or learning. They range in severity and may interfere with the acquisition and use of oral language, reading, written language, and mathematics. Learning disabilities may also involve difficulties with organizational skills, social perception, social interaction, and understanding the perspectives of others (Learning Disabilities Association of Canada, 2015).

In 1985, President Ronald Reagan stated the following in a proclamation. It reads in part:

“Awareness of learning disabilities is one of the most important advances in education in recent years. As more and more Americans become aware, our citizens with learning disabilities will have even greater opportunity to lead full and productive lives and to make a contribution to our society.”

Read on to see how some famous individuals with learning disabilities have greatly contributed to our society. These individuals show that although learning disabilities may present challenges, they don’t limit one’s chances for success. Having a learning disability may have in fact played an important role in helping these individuals find the determination to achieve their goals. The following partial list of prominent figures with learning disabilities can surely be a source of inspiration!

From the entertainment industry: Orlando Bloom, Tom Cruise, Whoopi Goldberg, Jay Leno, Keira Knightley, Steven Spielberg, and Henry Winkler

Sports figures: Muhammed Ali, Terry Bradshaw, Magic Johnson, and Tim Tebow

Business leaders: Richard Branson, Henry Ford, Charles Schwab, and Ted Turner

Journalist and writers: Agatha Christie, Anderson Cooper, Richard Engel, and F. Scott Fitzgerald

Scientists/Inventors: Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, and Albert Einstein

Military leaders: George Patton and Winston Churchill

If you or someone you know has a learning disability and is looking for assistance in overcoming some of the difficulties that may be present in the workplace, look no further. JAN’s resources include a newly updated Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Learning Disabilities, as well as Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Executive Functioning Deficits for accommodation ideas. We also have information on documentation of a learning disability, organizations, and SOAR – our Searchable Online Accommodation Resource. This tool can walk you step-by-step through the accommodation process, offer accommodation ideas, and provide product information. All of these resources can be found at Accommodation Ideas for Learning Disabilities.

JAN’s consultants on the cognitive/neurological team are available to help answer your questions about the accommodation process, disclosure, and information that can help you in your specific situation. Please feel free to contact us.

Resources:

Learning Disabilities Association of Canada. (2015). Official Definition of Learning Disabilities. Retrieved October 27, 2015 from http://ldac-acta.ca.

Famous People with the Gift of Dyslexia, retrieved from http://www.dyslexia.com/famous.htm October 27, 2015.

Success Stories: Celebrities with Dyslexia, ADHD, and Dyscalculia, retrieved from   https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/personal-stories/famous-people/success-stories-celebrities-with-dyslexia-adhd-and-dyscalculia October 27, 2015.

 

Work After Breast Cancer

Posted by Kim Cordingly on October 16, 2015 under Accommodations, Employers, Products / Technology | Comments are off for this article

By: Sheryl Grossman, Consultant – Motor Team

One of the most positive things about more people surviving breast cancer, and cancer diagnoses in general, is that life after a diagnosis goes on, including one’s work life. Many are able to continue working through treatment, while others choose to focus on treatment and then return to work. Often less recognized is that while a clinical diagnosis is made on a specific date, and various treatments are done on specific dates, the side effects may linger on for weeks, months, and sometimes years.

Cancer, as many oncologists say, is a lifelong, chronic condition. For some this may be a direct result of the disease process, while for others it may be the result of side effects from necessary, but often potent, treatment protocols.

Just like with any other chronic condition, people who have had breast cancer can be fantastic employees. Some return to work and continue on as they did prior to their diagnosis. Others may need accommodations to be the best employee they can be.

The following are some potential areas of accommodation that may assist someone who has had a diagnosis of breast cancer:

Need for ongoing medical treatment, follow-up appointments, and monitoring:

  1. Allow for a flexible schedule
  2. Allow employee to telework
  3. Allow for additional leave time

Need for an ergonomically adjusted workspace due to lifting restrictions, pain management, and so on:

  1. Provide workspace adjustments to desk height, monitor height, chair, arm support, and reach ranges for equipment and materials
  2. Provide ergonomically appropriate tools
  3. Allow for breaks from repetitive tasks
  4. Modify workspace layout to avoid tasks done over the head
  5. Allow time for physical movement to help circulation

Need for supports with cognitive processing:

  1. Allow for self-paced workload
  2. Adjust supervisory method to allow for prompting, adjusting instructional or management method, breaking large tasks into smaller tasks
  3. Allow for one task to be completed before the next is presented

Need to manage fatigue:

  1. Allow for periodic rest breaks
  2. Allow for a modified schedule
  3. Redesign workspace to bring all necessary materials within easy reach range
  4. Limit physical exertion required
  5. Move workspace closer to door, break room, or restroom
  6. Provide personal mobility device to maneuver around workspace without exerting more effort
  7. Allow telework from home and remote access to meetings

While wearing pink brings awareness to the needs of those who are living with or have survived breast cancer, providing accommodations concretely changes the lives of those who are affected, as well as strengthening the business as a whole.

For more information:

Accommodation Ideas for Cancer

EEOC Fact Sheet: Questions and Answers About Cancer in the Workplace and ADA

Strategies for Developing a Transgender-Inclusive Workplace

Posted by Kim Cordingly on October 14, 2015 under Accommodations, Employers, Organizations | Comments are off for this article

By: Tracie DeFreitas, Lead Consultant – ADA Specialist

Inclusion. Equality. Fairness. Respect. It’s reasonable to say that all of these words have significant meaning to everyone, particularly at work. All employees should be able to participate in, and contribute to, the progress and success of an organization by being included, by being afforded equal rights, and by being treated fairly and respectfully. However, sometimes employees feel they cannot be themselves at work and will not fully engage as part of the team if they don’t believe these basic human rights can be realized – if the workplace is not inclusive of all employees or the culture is not forward-thinking. This can be especially true for individuals who transition from one gender to another, or who identify as a different gender than what they were assigned at birth.

JAN receives inquiries from employers seeking information about ways to include transgender employees in the workplace. Transgender is a term for people whose gender identity, expression, or behavior are different from those typically associated with their assigned sex at birth (NCTE, 2015). For example, a transgender man may have been assigned female at birth, but identifies as a man. Many of the inquiries JAN receives related to transgender issues come from employers who have an employee who has been employed for some time and is known as one gender, but is transitioning to a different gender. Our discussions with employers and others often center-around supporting the employee’s transition and making modifications at work that ensure that transgender employees are able to work in a manner consistent with how they live their daily lives, based on their gender identity.

The Americans with Disabilities (ADA) does not apply to situations involving workers who are transgender because being transgender is not considered a disability under the ADA. However, more and more businesses are recognizing the need to establish policies related to accommodating transgender workers – without an established federal mandate to do so. The accommodation process can be similar to that applied to workers with disabilities. When a transgender employee makes the employer aware of his or her transition and identifies work-related needs as part of the process, it’s time to have an open dialogue with the employee to discuss the employee’s needs, work-related barriers, and solutions for overcoming those barriers. Ask how the environment or means of communication can be adapted to promote inclusion and make the effort to maintain a supportive work environment that enables the individual to be him or herself. It’s also critically important to educate human resource personnel, supervisors, and managers about respectfully discussing transgender issues with employees.

Having gender transition guidelines available for human resource personnel and supervisors and managers will prepare staff to appropriately communicate with transgender employees and manage accommodation situations. The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) offers practical information and examples of gender transition guidelines that can be adapted and implemented to promote a transgender-inclusive business. To learn more, see HRC’s Workplace Gender Transition Guidelines. For examples of guidelines implemented by national corporations, see Chevron’s Gender Transition Guidelines and Ernst & Young’s Gender Transition Guidelines.

There are many ways to support transgender workers. The following suggestions will be useful to businesses trying to promote a transgender-inclusive workplace:

  • Educate staff about what “transgender” means. A transgender person is someone whose sex assigned at birth is different from who they know they are on the inside. This includes people who have medically transitioned to align their internal knowledge of gender with their physical presentation and those who have not medically transitioned (HRC, 2015).
  • Train management staff to lead by example by treating transgender workers respectfully and fairly, and by becoming part of the individual’s support team.
  • Respect the name a transgender person is using. During the transition process, an individual will often change his or her name to align with their gender identity.
  • Use the individual’s preferred pronoun and encourage others to do so. For example, when an individual presents as female, use feminine references like she, her, hers. When a person presents as male, use masculine references like he, him, his. In uncertain cases, use the person’s first name (GLAAD, 2015).
  • Talk with the individual about ways to communicate his or her transition to others they must interact with at work – if the employee would like others to be informed. Ask if he or she wishes to inform their manager, co-workers, clients, etc. on their own, or if he or she prefers that this be done by the employer. Learn what information the employee would and would not like to share with others.
  • Remove gender-specific rules from a dress code or grooming policy.
  • Permit employees to use the restroom facilities that correspond with their gender identity. Employers may also establish single-occupancy gender-neutral (unisex) facilities or allow use of multiple-occupant, gender-neutral restroom facilities with lockable single occupant stalls. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued transgender inclusive restroom access guidelines. For more information, go to Best Practices: A Guide to Restroom Access for Transgender Workers.
  • Allow a flexible schedule and permit the use of leave for medical procedures.
  • Discuss if there is a preference to remain in his or her current position or to consider reassignment to another position during transition.
  • Update name and gender designations for human resource and administrative records once an employee has officially transitioned. Also, update employment-related photo identification.
  • Finally, respect the individual’s privacy and allow him or her the right to be who they are.

References

National Center for Transgender Equality. (2015). Transgender Terminology. Retrieved June 19, 2015 from http://transequality.org/issues/resources/transgender-terminology

Human Rights Campaign. (2015). Reporting About Transgender People? Read This. HRC’s Brief Guide to Getting It Right. Retrieved July 31, 2015 from http://www.hrc.org/resources/entry/reporting-about-transgender-people-read-this

Human Rights Campaign. (2015). Workplace Gender Transition Guidelines. Retrieved July 17, 2015 from http://www.hrc.org/resources/entry/workplace-gender-transition-guidelines

GLAAD. (2015). GLAAD’s Tips for Allies of Transgender People. Retrieved July 31, 2015 from http://www.glaad.org/transgender/allies

Mental Health Awareness – Creating a More Inclusive Workplace

Posted by Kim Cordingly on October 9, 2015 under Accommodations, Employers, Organizations | Comments are off for this article

By Daniel Tucker, Consultant — Cognitive/Neurological Team

October 10th is World Mental Health Day. Originally celebrated in 1992 as an initiative of the World Federation for Mental Health, its objectives included raising awareness of mental health issues throughout the world; encouraging individuals to educate themselves about mental health; and searching for ways to provide greater supports. With this in mind, we wanted to draw attention to the prevalence of mental health conditions, common misconceptions, and steps employers can take to foster a supportive and inclusive work environment.

According to a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) survey, approximately 43.8 million adults experience some form of mental health condition in a given year. That’s 18.5 percent or nearly 1 in 5 of all adults in the U.S. It’s a common misconception that mental health impairments affect a small number of individuals. These statistics show that mental health conditions as a whole are actually relatively common.

Given these statistics and the number of individuals employed or seeking employment with mental health impairments, employers may want to consider steps they can take to raise awareness in the workplace. With October being National Disability Employment Awareness Month, it’s a good time to consider providing disability awareness training where topics relevant to mental health can be discussed. By bringing attention to the fact that mental health conditions are common, and only one part of a person’s identity, employers may help reduce the still pervasive stigma around mental illness, and make employees feel more comfortable and supported in the workplace.

In terms of disability etiquette, it’s important to know how to talk about mental health in a way that is respectful rather than offensive. For example, the terms “mental defective,” “afflicted,” “victim of,” and “sufferer of” are generally antiquated and offensive. The terms “mental health impairment” and “psychiatric impairment” are generally accepted, and individuals may have a personal preference as to what terms they prefer. Also, it’s generally better to use person first language – focusing on the person first, not the disability. For example, “an employee with bipolar disorder,” as opposed to “a bipolar employee.” When speaking with an employee that has disclosed a mental health impairment, it may be helpful to listen for the words they use to describe themselves, and to ask whether they have a preference about what terms you use.

The Employer Assistance and Resource Network (EARN) offers employers numerous resources for creating a more inclusive workplace including information on disability etiquette.

JAN also offers a wide variety of resources to support the successful employment of individuals with mental health impairments.

If you have a specific situation or question you’d like to discuss with a JAN consultant, we encourage you to contact us directly or visit AskJAN.org.

References:

Any Mental Illness (AMI) Among Adults. (n.d.). Retrieved October 7, 2015, from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/prevalence/any-mental-illness-ami-among-adults.shtml.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Results from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings, NSDUH Series H-49, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 14-4887. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2014.