Take a Deep Breath

Posted by JAN Tech on January 28, 2015 under Accommodations, Employers, Products / Technology | Comments are off for this article

By: Beth Loy, Ph.D. – Principal Consultant

For individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), it can be difficult to take a deep breath at times. This difficulty may be triggered by temperature changes, humidity levels, contaminants, pollution, chemical fumes, and the performance of a strenuous task. COPD is a progressive disease that gets worse over time, making it hard to breathe (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 2013). Millions of people have been diagnosed with varying levels of COPD. However, with advancement in oxygen portability, medications, and therapies, many individuals are continuing to work after a diagnosis.

High air quality is very important for those working with COPD. To improve air quality, workplace accommodations can include: air purifiers, fragrance-free common areas, and fresh air breaks. Fans can also help circulate air in confined areas. Telework and a modification of work schedule can also be helpful during times of inclement weather, such as excessively hot or cold temperatures.

Location of workstation can also be important to someone with COPD. Being close to food areas, restrooms, cleaning materials, and maintenance areas can cause odors that are hazardous to someone with COPD. Keeping a work area free of pollutants such as cleaning agents, pesticides, exhaust fumes, and tobacco smoke will improve air quality.

Use of oxygen at work is often a consideration when accommodating an employee with COPD. Besides compressed oxygen gas in a tank or cylinder, many portable and stationary concentrators are now available for use, making it easier for someone with COPD to use supplemental oxygen outside of the house. This could include work-related travel. Accommodations may need to be made to arrange for the transport of an employee’s oxygen when the employee is required to travel for work. This may include talking with hotels, airlines, and other facilities regarding what is needed for the employee to carry oxygen. Safety is always an important consideration with oxygen use, including accessing a safe electrical connection and keeping oxygen canisters and other devices away from an open flame. Often, an oxygen supply company will do an on-site visit regarding safe usage upon request.

For more information on how to have supplemental oxygen in the workplace, see: Oxygen Therapy Safety Tips: Preventing Fires and Other Accidents.

Other resources that might be helpful:

Because COPD can have such serious effects on an individual, it may also be linked to anxiety and depression. The lifestyle changes that accompany the disease cause physical as well as mental challenges. For more information on accommodations for individuals with anxiety and depression, see JAN’s Accommodation Information by Disability: A to Z. For additional information on accommodation ideas, contact JAN directly.

 

Campaign for Disability Employment “Who I Am” PSA Airing Nationally

Posted by Kim Cordingly on January 15, 2015 under Campaign for Disability Employment, Employers, Organizations | Comments are off for this article

By: Tracie DeFreitas, Lead Consultant – ADA Specialist

The new “Who I Am” public service announcement from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s Campaign for Disability Employment is now airing on television stations around the country. The PSA features nine people with disabilities who are not defined solely by their disability but instead by their many life roles — including working in jobs they love. The participants in the “Who I Am” PSA remind us that recognizing the value they add to the workplace fosters a work culture welcoming of the talents of all individuals. Fostering a work environment that is flexible and open to the talents of all qualified individuals, including those with disabilities, actually promotes workplace success for everyone.

What can YOU do to help promote inclusion and opportunities for people with disabilities in the workplace? Show your support by encouraging your local television stations to air the “Who I Am” PSA. “Who I Am” reminds us to see one another for who we are and what we can contribute. The PSA will positively impact television viewers and empower those with disabilities – especially those with non-apparent disabilities – to bring their whole selves to everything they do – including their work. The CDE invites you to encourage stations to air the PSA by sending a letter or e-mail to your local television stations. The CDE offers a template letter to make it easy.

While the “Who I Am” PSA is intended for television broadcast, the CDE would like to see the PSA and its important message distributed as widely as possible. To facilitate this outreach, everyone is encouraged to share the “Who I Am” PSA by accessing the PSA section of the Website. There are English and Spanish versions of the PSA available in both audio introduced and open captioned formats. Also, as part of the  “Who I Am” Outreach Toolkit, the CDE will soon offer accompanying posters and discussion guides, which will include DVD copies of all PSA formats.

Another way to participate in the CDE’s effort is to promote inclusion by sharing the diverse factors that make you who YOU are. Whatever unique identities you bring with you to work each day, chances are you’ve drawn upon many of them to do your job better, whether consciously or not. Because everyone can add value to the workplace, the CDE has launched the Ask Me Who I Am public engagement effort, which asks everyone to use hashtag #WhoIAmPSA to share one or more of their diverse identities to demonstrate the various skills and talents all workers can contribute. Join the effort by sharing what factors make you who YOU are.

The Campaign for Disability Employment is a collaborative effort to promote positive employment outcomes for people with disabilities by encouraging employers and others to recognize the value and talent they bring to the workplace. Stay current on the CDE’s initiatives by following the Campaign for Disability Employment using Twitter and Facebook. To learn more about this campaign and to view this and other PSAs, visit the CDE Website.

Elevating Lift Office Chairs

Posted by Kim Cordingly on January 8, 2015 under Accommodations, Products / Technology, Vendors | Comments are off for this article

By: Linda Batiste, Principal Consultant

For years, JAN consultants searched for an office chair that can elevate while a person is seated in the chair and that also has a braking system to prevent the chair from moving when a person is getting into or out of the chair. A chair with such features could be useful for employees with various motor impairments working in all sorts of jobs. For example:

A bank teller with multiple sclerosis uses a motorized scooter, but must work at a standing height. She needs to transfer into a chair and then raise up to the height of the teller workstation. The chair needs to stay in place while she is transferring, but then allow movement once she is seated.

A cashier with cerebral palsy and lower extremity limitations cannot stand for long periods, but has to work at a standing height. He cannot get up on a standing-height stool, plus he needs more support than offered by a stool; he needs an ergonomic chair that can raise him up to the proper height.

A little person works in an office setting with shared workspace. She needs a chair that will raise and lower her to average desk height while she is seated in the chair.

Happily, JAN consultants recently found a couple options for these types of accommodation situations:

The first is called the VELA Tango, which is a chair that has a both a locking mechanism to stabilize it as needed and a motorized lifting mechanism that operates with a person seated in the chair.  If you want to see the chair in action, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSQsBflJIU4.

The other option is an elevating office chair from Clark Medical. This one is basically a lift with an ergonomic chair attached. The company will also custom mount other chairs to the lift if preferred.

And if you know of any other office chairs that can be raised and lowered with a person seated in them, please let us know!