JAN: Job Accommodation Network

JAN en Espaņol

Print this Page

A A A Text Size

SOAR: Searchable Online Accommodation Resource

Step 2: Select the Limitation

Learning Disabilities

Skip Intro


According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (2006), learning disabilities are disorders that affect the ability to understand or use spoken or written language, do mathematical calculations, coordinate movements, or direct attention. Although learning disabilities occur in very young children, the disorders are usually not recognized until the child reaches school age. Learning disabilities are a lifelong condition; they are not outgrown or cured, though many people develop coping techniques through special education, tutoring, medication, therapy, personal development, or adaptation of learning skills. Approximately 15 million children, adolescents, and adults have learning disabilities in the United States (National Center for Learning, 2006).

What types of learning disabilities are there?

Learning disabilities can be divided into three broad categories: developmental speech and language disorders, academic skills disorders, and other (such as coordination disorders). Each category includes more specific disorders, which are described below.

Specific Learning Disability:
A disorder in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, which may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, write, spell or to do mathematical calculations. Included in this category are expressive writing disorders and other expressive language disorders.
Dyslexia:
A person with dyslexia has average to above average intelligence, but has deficits in visual, auditory, or motor process, which interfere with reading and reading comprehension. The individual may also have difficulties with learning to translate printed words into spoken words with ease.
Dyscalculia:
A person with dyscalculia has average to above average intelligence, but has difficulty with numbers or remembering facts over a long period of time. Some persons have spatial problems and difficulty aligning numbers into proper columns. Some persons may reverse numbers, and have difficulty in mathematical operations.
Dyspraxia:
A person with dyspraxia has problems with messages from the brain being properly transmitted to the body. Though the muscles are not paralyzed or weak, they have problems working well together. Dyspraxia might also cause speech problems, poor posture, poor sense of directions, and/or difficulty with actions such as throwing and catching.
Auditory Perceptual Deficit:
A person with auditory perceptual deficit has difficulty receiving accurate information from the sense of hearing (there is no problem with the individual's hearing, just in how the brain interprets what is heard) and might have problems understanding and remembering oral instructions, differentiating between similar sounds, or hearing one sound over a background noise.
Visual Perceptual Deficit:
The individual has difficulties receiving and/or processing accurate information from their sense of sight; might have a problem picking out an object from a background of other objects or seeing things in correct order.

Accommodations are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. We have compiled a non-inclusive list of limitations that result in common accommodation situations. In addition, you can find more information at JAN's A to Z Web page at: http://askjan.org/media/atoz.htm.

Please select the limitation that corresponds with the individual needing an accommodation below.

ASK A JAN CONSULTANT
JAN provides free, confidential technical assistance about job accommodations and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Send Us Feedback.
(800)526-7234 (Voice)
(877)781-9403 (TTY)
Live Help
Email
ODEP: JAN is a service of the Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor
Accessibility  |  Copyright  |  Disclaimer  |  Privacy Statement  |  Site Map