What Are the JAN Consultants Reading?

Posted by Kim Cordingly on May 29, 2014 under Blogging with JAN, Consultants' Corner, Employers, Entrepreneurship / Self Employment, General Information, Organizations | Comments are off for this article

Beth Loy – Principal Consultant

I recently read Laura L. Hayes’ article How to Stop Violence: Mentally ill people aren’t killers. Angry people are.

In this Slate.com article, Hayes discusses examples of individuals who were characterized as “mentally ill” by society, but who acted out of anger to commit crimes. These individuals, she argues, were controlled by that behavior and committed violent acts on someone else because of anger, not a mental health condition. Citing examples and statistics that show most violent crimes are committed by individuals who do not have a mental health condition, Hayes goes on to discuss research studies, media speculation, biological responses, gun regulation, and references in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Hayes argues that violent crimes committed by people with a mental health diagnosis get a lot of attention from the media, but are extremely rare. And, Hayes writes, anger fuels violence, not a mental health diagnosis.

Linda Batiste – Principal Consultant

After receiving several questions in a row about whether the ADA applies to foreign employment, I decided to read up on the subject. I found several publications on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s Website, including:

Employee Rights When Working for Multinational Employers-Fact Sheet

The Equal Employment Opportunity Responsibilities of Multinational Employers – Fact Sheet

Enforcement Guidance on Application of Title VII and the Americans with Disabilities Act to Conduct Overseas and to Foreign Employers Discriminating in the United States

After reading these publications, I decided to write up a summary for the JAN Website to serve as a quick reference on this subject:

Consultants’ Corner: Does the ADA Apply to Foreign Employment?

I hope you find the summary useful!

Anne Hirsh – JAN Co-Director

I am reading any and all articles that I can find on the new regulations for Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act that went into effect on March 24, 2014. Employers are hungry for information on how to effectively implement self-identification of disability within their company as well as how to find qualified talent. They are also either creating or reviewing existing company reasonable accommodation policies including reasonable accommodation for onboarding. OFFCP continues to update its Website and FAQs.

This article on Job Application/Interview Stage Dos and Don’ts may be of interest.

Here is a JAN article on incorporating reasonable accommodation into a company onboarding procedure.

JAN’s archived Federal Contractor Webcast series may also be of interest

Sheryl Grossman – Consultant, Motor Team

Since recently returning from the Jewish Women Entrepreneurs Annual Conference, I’m really excited to pick up an often referenced book by Deborah Gallant entitled Shine Online.  According to Ms. Gallant, “Shine Online is a 100-page book that answers every question you have about what to do…and in what order…,” regarding the Internet marketing of your business.  For more tips on building a successful business, see her Website.

Daniel Tucker – Consultant, Cognitive/Neurological Team

I recently read an article in Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin entitled Shame-Focused Attitudes toward Mental Health Problems: The Role of Gender and Culture (2014) by Nan Zhang Hampton and Seneca E. Sharp. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences based on gender and three ethnicities (Asian, Latino, and Caucasian American) concerning internal attitudes toward one’s own mental health impairment.  Previous research suggested that women feel more shame than men, however, this study concluded there was no significant difference between genders across the three ethnicities. The results of the study did suggest there was a significant difference in attitudes across ethnicities, with Asians reporting the least amount of Internal Shame (IS), and Latinos reporting they would feel the most shame as compared to Asians and Caucasian Americans. The authors attributed these findings to cultural values, particularly Latino cultures tending to place high value on family honor and the stigmatization of mental illness being seen as a dishonor to the family.

In conclusion, the authors pointed out the implications for rehabilitation counselors. Due to the shame associated with mental health impairments among Latinos, they may be less likely to seek rehabilitation services. As a result, the authors suggest rehabilitation counselors should put more focus on encouraging Latinos to “get facts” by developing educational workshops and providing materials to service providers who would have contact with individuals from this population.

It is probable that these findings and suggestions would be applicable in the workplace as well. Given the diversity of today’s workforce, employers may benefit from looking at ways to effectively communicate disability awareness with the goal of reducing stigma and helping all employees to feel they can approach their employers about reasonable accommodations. Most accommodations, especially those for mental health impairments, cost nothing, while the process of replacing an otherwise qualified employee can be costly.

Hampton, N.Z., & Sharp, S.E. (2013).  Shame-Focused Attitudes toward Mental Health Problems:  The Role of Gender and Culture.  Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, 57 (3), 170-181.

Melanie Whetzel – Senior Consultant, Cognitive/Neurological Team

I am reading The Essential Brain Injury Guide, a publication of the Brain Injury Association of America. With the number of questions and often complex requests for assistance we receive on the cognitive/neurological team in the area of brain injuries, it makes sense to expand my knowledge as much as possible. The guide contains eight chapters ranging from understanding the brain and brain injury, to understanding and treating functional impacts, to family, legal, and ethical issues. I will be reading and learning from this guide for quite some time to come.

Tracie DeFreitas – Lead Consultant, ADA Specialist

JAN Consultants must be familiar with many different workplace laws that impact the employment of people with all types of medical impairments. In particular, we offer in-depth technical assistance on the employment provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and use a number of enforcement guidance documents issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to explain employers’ obligations and employees’ rights under the statute. I read and share many of these documents daily and so can you by going to JAN’s AskJAN.org ADA Library under EEOC Guidances.

Another law JAN Consultants frequently receive questions about is the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). FMLA often poses unique challenges for employers and so in-order to stay up-to-date on the latest trends and issues, I’ve been following a Blog entitled FMLA Insights. This informative Blog is authored by Jeff Nowak, who is co-chair of the labor and employment practice at Franczek Radelet where he represents employers in all aspects of employment law. The Blog addresses practical FMLA topics of interest to employers, highlights important court decisions, and provides updates on U.S. Department of Labor enforcement practices and initiatives – among many other FMLA and state family leave law issues. To learn more, you can go to the Website and sign-up to receive e-mail notices about new entries.

Kim Cordingly – Lead Consultant, Self-Employment Team

I’m currently reading the 2nd edition of Making Self-Employment Work for People with Disabilities (2014) by Cary Griffin, David Hammis, Beth Keeton and Molly Sullivan. The 1st edition has been a vital resource for JAN customers pursuing self-employment, so we’re thrilled to be referring individuals to this new edition.

I’ve also recently read the Office of Disability Employment Policy report on Self-Employment for People with Disabilities (2013). It discusses the experiences and outcomes of ODEP’s Start-Up USA grant projects, which sought to “…develop research-based policy and provide technical assistance to organizations geared toward achieving sustainable self-employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.”

These are both indispensable reading for anyone interested in advancing self-employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

Also, I recently attended a conference on Women and Economic Security at the University of Michigan, which prompted me to read the following article related to women with disabilities and poverty:

Income Poverty and Material Hardship among U.S. Women with Disabilities (2009) by Susan Parish, Roderick Rose, and Megan Andrews – Social Service Review.

It includes data that suggest, “…women with disabilities experience such hardships as food insecurity, housing instability, inadequate health care, and loss of phone service at rates that are higher than those among nondisabled women. Rates of hardship remain higher even after adjusting for a host of individual characteristics, including marital status, age, race, and education.”

Much discussed at the conference was The Shriver Report – A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back from the Brink (2014), which is next on my reading list.

Teresa Goddard – Senior Consultant, Sensory Team

I am planning a vacation, so am reading Walt Disney World with Disabilities by Stephen Ashley.  It was published in 2008, but still has detailed information on many rides and attractions. Next on my list is PassPorter’s Open Mouse for Walt Disney World and the Disney Cruise Line: Easy Access Vacations for Travelers with Extra Challenges by Deb Wills and Debra Martin Koma.

Earlier this month while making vacation plans, I picked up a copy of Walt Disney World with Disabilities by Stephen Ashley. Although the information was a bit dated due to changes both in the attractions at Walt Disney World and in the park’s system for providing accommodations since 2008, I found the book’s detailed descriptions of rides, restaurants, and events such as fireworks to be helpful as my party and I decided which parks to visit and how to make the most of our FastPass ride reservations; this is a system that allows one to reserve a place in a faster moving line for a small number of attractions each day. What impressed me most about this book was the attention to details of interest to those with hidden impairments such as fragrance sensitivity. In fact, the information on lighting and on rides with fragrances helped two members of our party avoid potentially problematic situations and allowed them to plan ahead about how to self-accommodate in some areas of the park. I would like to see this resource updated to reflect current park conditions and practices. Ideally, I would also prefer to have an accessible digital copy. The book is very large — too large in fact to fit in the bag that I wanted to carry to the park, so I memorized all pertinent details in advance. Also, while the book was large the print was small.

If you are looking for information on navigating Walt Disney World as a person with a disability, this book is only one of many resources that you may wish to explore.

The Walt Disney World Website also contains a wealth of information.

Elisabeth Simpson – Senior Consultant, Mobility/Sensory Team

I recently read an article in Counseling Today magazine on the role of school counselors in transition planning titled Focusing on ability, not disability by Amy Cook, Laura Hayden and Felicia Wilczenski. The article discusses how school counselors can be advocates for students with intellectual disabilities (ID) as they transition into post-secondary education. They highlight programs where school students with ID work with educational coaches and can audit or enroll in college courses for credit. The article states, “… educational institutions have increased postsecondary educational options for individuals with ID, including offering greater access to higher education through concurrent enrollment between high schools and universities. Such programs provide students with ID the opportunity to attend college and enroll in college classes, participate in college-based activities (for example, clubs, intramural sports and extracurricular activities) and, in some cases, reside on campus.”

What Are the JAN Consultants Reading?

Posted by Kim Cordingly on April 29, 2013 under Accommodations, Blogging with JAN, Entrepreneurship / Self Employment, Organizations | Comments are off for this article

In what we hope will become a regular Blog feature, we’d like to share with you some of what the JAN consultants are currently reading. In our lives, we’re all so inundated with information – articles, books, reports, policy documents, and so on. Sometimes it’s helpful to hear what others find useful. In the field of disability, accommodation, and employment, our consultants read a wide variety of materials. We hope this will inspire you to check out what they find informative and inspiring.

Linda – Principal Consultant

If you work and also care for a family member who has a disability, you may wonder whether your employer has to provide you with the accommodations you need so you can care for your family member. JAN provides information about the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which requires employers with 15 or more employees to provide reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities. The ADA does not require employers to provide accommodations for employees who have family members with disabilities, but it does prohibit discrimination on the basis of such associations. This means, for example, if your employer grants schedule modifications to other employees for child care, then it would probably be discriminatory not to grant you a schedule modification so you can care for a family member with a disability. This is referred to as the “Association Provision” of the ADA.

I find the following document particularly helpful on this topic and refer JAN’s customers to it:

Also, there may be other laws that provide you with rights related to caring for a family member with a disability. As a starting point, see:

If you would like to share your experience with working and caring for a family member with a disability, feel free to do so here.

Daniel – Consultant on the Cognitive/Neurological Team

I recently read an article published in the journal Behavior Research and Therapy entitled “Separating Hoarding from OCD.” I discovered this article as part of my research for a piece I’m writing for JAN about hoarding in the workplace. The article does a great job of explaining the current confusion over what excessive hoarding is exactly, and the reasons why it should not be lumped in with OCD. Here are some of the differences between hoarding and OCD identified in the article:

  • There are more than five times as many excessive hoarders as individuals with OCD.
  • Not everyone with OCD engages in excessive hoarding. It is estimated that between 11% and 33% of individuals with OCD are also excessive hoarders.
  • Individuals with OCD often have “insight” into their condition, recognizing that their behavior is irrational and problematic while excessive hoarders usually do not.
  • Excessive hoarding is unresponsive to traditional cognitive behavioral therapy and medications that are often effective in the treatment of OCD.

For more information about this article see:

Beth – Principal Consultant

I recently read Michael Hingson’s Thunder Dog: The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog, and the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero.

This New York Times best-seller by Michael Hingson tells the true story of how he and his guide dog Roselle survived 9/11. Blind since birth, Michael is an inspirational speaker who lost Roselle in 2011, but shares his fond memories with readers. The book tells the engaging story of how Roselle saved the lives of Michael and many others who were in the World Trade Center on that fateful day.

Look here for more information on Michael Hingson and his book.

Teresa – Senior Consultant on the Sensory Team

May is Better Speech and Hearing Month so in preparation, I’m re-reading an old favorite by West Virginia University’s own Ken St. Louis entitled Living with Stuttering: Stories, Basics, Resources, and Hope. The book discusses, “the current explanations and treatments for stuttering while recognizing that the different ways in which stutterers are affected go deeper than their struggles with fluency; the effects are as diverse as the vast stuttering population itself.”

For more information see:

Anne – Co-Director

Maybe it’s because my youngest is graduating from high school this month and will be off to college soon, but I’ve been reading a good bit about the aging workforce. One very interesting piece was recently released by ODEP’s NTAR Leadership Center entitled The Aging Workforce: The Role of Medical Professionals in Helping Older Workers and Workers with Disabilities to Stay at Work or Return to Work and Remain Employed by Maria Heidkamp and Jennifer Christain, MD, MPH. The report was the outgrowth of a one-day roundtable event in 2012 — convened to explore the relationship among, “medical professionals, employers, and the public workforce and vocational rehabilitation systems in terms of their current and desired roles in preventing work disability, with ‘disability’ in this context defined as the absence from work due to a medical condition.”

JAN has a couple of documents on the Website that may be of interest to those interested in this topic as well.

Tracie – Lead Consultant

JAN receives many inquiries from employers and employees who have questions related to the ADA and performance and conduct standards. In some cases, an individual’s disability may contribute to performance or conduct issues. JAN offers information to help people understand how the ADA applies to these sometimes complicated employment situations. My go-to resource on the topic is the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s guidance on this topic — The Americans with Disabilities Act: Applying Performance and Conduct Standards to Employees with Disabilities.

Melanie – Senior Consultant on the Cognitive/Neurological Team

I’ve been working on gathering and assimilating information and accommodation ideas on executive functioning for an upcoming JAN Webcast. Executive functioning involves abilities such as planning, organizing, managing time, paying attention, and remembering details. One book I’ve been reading that has been particularly helpful is Dyslexia in the Workplace by Diana Bartlett and Sylvia Moody.

Kim – Lead Consultant on the Self-Employment Team

I receive a number of inquiries from individuals with disabilities wanting to start craft, art, or handmade product related businesses. These skillfully produced creative items can include quilts, pottery, stained glass, photography, collage, jewelry, wind chimes, woodworking, and so on. In my research, I came across a book by Kari Chapin called The Handmade Marketplace – How to Sell Your Crafts Locally, Globally, and Online. JAN’s customers frequently have questions about how to successfully market their products and use social media effectively. This book includes very useful information on both of these topics – presenting it in a very informative and accessible way.

JAN Blog: What Works for Me?

Posted by Kim Cordingly on April 2, 2013 under Accommodations, Blogging with JAN, What Works for Me | Comments are off for this article

What Works for Me?

The JAN Blog is an opportunity for you to share with others your workplace accommodation solutions. JAN receives over 45,000 contacts per year – conversations with all of you that help us better understand what’s working effectively in your workplaces. We have a great deal to learn from one another. We encourage you to share your experiences. Your accommodation success stories can benefit many others around the nation.

JAN Situations and Solutions

Last month, Melanie Whetzel, JAN’s senior consultant on the cognitive/neurological team, traveled to Little Rock, Arkansas, to present at the state APSE conference. Her presentation to nearly 125 participants focused on using JAN’s services and the accommodation process. According to Melanie, one of the best parts of traveling for JAN is meeting new people in locations throughout the United States. She commented, “These are people who are on the front lines of the employment scene — helping to prepare individuals with disabilities for employment, working with employers in the hiring process, and determining accommodations that will assist the employees in effectively doing their jobs.”

Many of the conference participants were interested in real accommodation situations fielded by JAN consultants. Here’s a JAN situation and solution discussed by Melanie at the APSE conference:

Situation: A retail employee with an intellectual disability had difficulty remembering when to take his breaks and lunch, and when to return to the sales floor.

Solution: Using a programmable watch, his job coach helped him set the times for his lunch and breaks, and when it was time to return to work. The watch was set to vibrate so the employee knew exactly when it was time to leave for breaks and lunch and when to return to the sales floor.

Man pointing at watch

For information on APSE — Association of People Supporting EmploymentFirst — see APSE’s Website